Jaxon

My name is Mark. I met my wife in 2001 and we were married by 2003. Lorraine is 9 years older than me and already had a teenage son.  Feeling time wasn’t on our side we added a daughter, a son and another daughter to our family.  Our family was complete but in 2013 we found out we were expecting again.

It was not to be. Lorraine suffered a miscarriage at 10 weeks. It was probably the hardest most heart-breaking thing either of us had ever been through. Read More…

Jack

The day after the 14 week scan, which fell on a Thursday, we received a phone call from the Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton, saying that our scan had presented – and I forget the exact wording here – a 1-in-3 chance of baby having Down syndrome. The link midwife (for diagnoses of chromosomal abnormalities and the like) wanted to invite us for a scan with fetal medicine on the Monday morning. We had a brief phone conversation and she was both extremely helpful and informative. Read More…

Megan

Hi I am Megan Wilcox and I have Down Syndrome but that doesn’t stop me being amazing.

I started riding when I was just two years old at Follifoot Park Riding centre in Harrogate. I started riding because my Mummy used to ride and she was really good. I ride now nearly every day with the Burrell Dressage Team at Pannal, where my pony Dunks lives. Read More…

Kara

My name is Sara and I am the mum of two wonderful little girls – well they are not so little anymore. They both adore ballet, they love swimming and they both want the same toy even if they have not played with it for six months. My eldest daughter is nearly 7 and a huge fan of my little pony and ever after high. My youngest really has a fixation on Topsy and Tim and anything her older sister does is of course wonderful. We are a typical busy family juggling work (I’m a college lecturer), school, preschool and clubs. The only unique factor about us is that Kara has Down syndrome. Read More…

Jack

For 6 years Richard and I had been trying for a baby. Our first IVF attempt was a success but we sadly lost that little one at 9 weeks into the pregnancy. After a couple of unsuccessful attempts, I found I was carrying twins, we were ecstatic at this news and I was determined we were going to go full term (37 weeks for twins) and all would be ok. Read More…

Ella

When Ella was born, we were told soon after her birth that she has Down’s Syndrome. Our world was knocked completely off kilter and we found ourselves grieving for the child we had imagined we would have, a child who didn’t actually exist but whom we had already fallen in love with and had dreams and aspirations for.

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Ted

Very soon after having my first daughter I fell pregnant with a little boy and, again, we refused all screening but had all the routine growth scans which showed a ‘healthy’ baby.

At 35wks I felt a familiar ache and I tried to convince myself that contractions hadn’t started so early, but after a long night of slow pain I rang the hospital who, as it was quiet on the ward, told me to pop in and they’d take a quick look at me.

After a quick examination, it transpired that I was 8cm dilated and our son would be putting in an early appearance. Extra staff filled up the room to make the necessary arrangements for neonatal equipment and an epidural was arranged to slow labour down whilst the baby received antibiotics to prevent infection. Even though slightly tense, the atmosphere was fairly light and the radio was playing happily in the background. We were excited to meet our baby, a bit earlier than expected but we were optimistic that all would be well.

A few hours later and following a very quick delivery Ted was born; 35 weeks+2 days, 6lbs 10oz and absolutely perfect. He was put straight on my chest and I loved him with an instant rush of emotion but something about his appearance troubled me. We quickly realised that he was blue and floppy and quiet, so the nurses stepped in to help him and I couldn’t shake from my mind the thought that he looked ‘different’ to how I was expecting.
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Chloe

I’m Jade, Chloe’s mum.  I was 19 when I found out I was pregnant, and I hadn’t given the possibility of Chloe having DS a 2nd thought.  It wasn’t until a private 3D scan when I was 30 weeks pregnant had picked up on Chloe’s AVSD (a hole in her heart) that I was given a 50/50 chance of Chloe being born with DS. In that moment, I felt like my world was falling apart. The daughter I thought I was having had gone, and was replaced with a baby that I thought wouldn’t be able to learn, wouldn’t be accepted, wouldn’t be able to do any of the things parents want their children to be able to do.  

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Heidi

Hiya, my name is Heidi and I am 22 and I live independently in a flat, I have been living there for a year now and I am loving it. I do my own cooking and cleaning with only a little bit of support and encouragement from my amazing future guides, I may have down’s syndrome but that has never stopped me from leading a fulfilled and crazy life.

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Lily

In May 2015 my husband James, who was 32 and I who was 28, were absolutely over joyed to discover we had conceived on our honeymoon. At our 12 weeks scan we saw our beautiful baby for the first time and it was all I ever imagined it to be; until the sonographer ended the scan and informed us that due to my blood test results combined with the measurements of the babies neck we had a 1 in 99 “risk” of our baby having down syndrome. We were taken to a small room to talk with a midwife who told us about invasive tests offered by the NHS which would give us a more definite answer. She also informed us of a very quick and simple non invasive test called a Serenity Test, which involved another scan and blood sample. We weren’t too worried as we didn’t see 1 in 99 as bad odds but decided we wanted to know to take away the worry, and could also find out the sex of the baby, so arranged for the Serenity Test.

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